No Excuse Fitness by Niko2015-08-03T21:19:50Z http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/feed/atom/WordPress Rifat Jipu <![CDATA[8 Best Dumbbell Exercises (HIT EVERY MUSCLE!)]]> http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/?p=4280 2015-08-03T21:19:50Z 2015-08-03T21:19:50Z Jeff from ATHLEAN-X shows us the 8 best dumbbell exercises. Dumbbells are definitely one of the best form of workout equipment due to their ability to be used in small spaces and their high degree of athletic carryover. With their three dimensional freedom, dumbbells allow you to workout in […]

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Jeff from ATHLEAN-X shows us the 8 best dumbbell exercises.

Dumbbells are definitely one of the best form of workout equipment due to their ability to be used in small spaces and their high degree of athletic carryover. With their three dimensional freedom, dumbbells allow you to workout in all planes of motion and require a great deal of core strength and stability to use them properly. That said, choosing the best dumbbell exercises ever can be quite a challenge since there are so many to choose from. In this video, I picked the 8 best exercises with dumbbells and give you a reason why each has earned its spot.

To begin, lets take a look at the best dumbbell exercises. They are:

  • Dumbbell Curl and Press
  • Crush Grip Goblet Squats
  • Thrusters
  •  Farmers Carries
  •  One Arm DB Incline Bench Press
  • DB Pullovers
  • Swings
  • Tripod Dumbbell Rows

Each of these exercises require either just a single dumbbell or two dumbbells. They were chosen given their ability to work multiple muscle groups in one dumbbell only workout. The more muscles you can train in one workout the quicker your training session will be and the more impact you can have on your body in a shorter period of time.

Dumbbell only workouts can be incredibly challenging. In fact, some people think that you can’t effectively train your legs with db’s since you aren’t able to load up the weight high enough. That’s not true at all. You can choose exercises that you load with even 100lb dumbbells and perform on a single leg and you are sure to be pushing yourself to your limits.

The same can be said for dumbbell chest workouts and dumbbell back and arm workouts. The fact that you aren’t using a barbell does not sacrifice the quality or effectiveness of the training session. That said, you cannot continue to lift light dumbbells and think that you are going to get a great enough workout. Even if you are training at home, aim to lift the heaviest dumbbells that you can lift if you want to build muscle in your workouts.

This article was originally published on GYM Flow 100

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Rifat Jipu <![CDATA[Eating Before And After Exercise]]> http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/?p=4276 2015-07-31T19:40:48Z 2015-07-31T19:40:48Z When you exercise, you do it in order to try to maintain good health. You know that you have to eat so that your body has the energy to perform the workouts that you do as well as for everyday tasks. But, just what you should eat […]

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When you exercise, you do it in order to try to maintain good health. You know that you have to eat so that your body has the energy to perform the workouts that you do as well as for everyday tasks. But, just what you should eat before and after you workouts is important for making the best of your workouts. Also, how long you eat before and after each workout is equally important.

Whether you are going to be doing a cardio workout or a resistance workout, you should try to make it a point to eat a mix of carbohydrates and protein. What determines the percentage of carbohydrates and protein you should consume is whether you are doing cardio or resistance and the intensity level you will be working at.

The ideal time to eat your pre workout meal is 1 hour before you start. If you are working at a lower intensity level, keep this meal down to around 200 calories or so. If you are working at a higher intensity level, you may need this meal to be as high as 400 to 500 calories.

If you are doing a cardio session, you will need to eat a mix of around 2/3 carbohydrates and 1/3 protein. This will give you longer sustained energy from the extra carbs with enough protein to keep muscle from breaking down during your workout.

If you are doing a resistance session, you should eat a mix of around 1/3 carbohydrates and 2/3 protein. This will give you enough energy from the carbs to perform each set you do and the extra protein will help keep muscle breakdown to a minimum during your workout. It has been shown that your body most effectively uses protein during exertion meaning that taking in more protein before resistance workouts aids in faster recovery as well.

Now, eating after a workout is just as important as the pre workout meal. Remember that when you exercise whether it is a cardio or a resistance session, you deplete energy in the form of glycogen. Our brain and central nervous system relies on glycogen as their main source of fuel so if we don’t replace it after exercise, our bodies will begin to break down muscle tissue into amino acids, then convert them into usable fuel for the brain and central nervous system.

Also, mostly during resistance workouts, you break down muscle tissue by creating micro tears. This means that right after a workout; your muscles go into a repair mode. Proteins are the key macronutrient for muscle repair and so you don’t want muscle breaking down further to create fuel in place of lost glycogen.

If you have just finished a cardio session, you will need to consume mostly carbohydrates, preferably ones with high fiber. Oatmeal, rice, whole wheat pasta, and most northern fruits are good sources. Try to consume around 30 to 50 grams of these carbohydrates after a cardio session. After cardio, it is ok to eat within 5 to 10 minutes of completion.

If you have just finished a resistance session, you will need a combination of carbohydrates and protein. Because unlike cardio workouts, with resistance workouts you are breaking down muscle tissue by creating micro tears. The protein is needed to build up and repair these tears so the muscle can increase in size and strength. The carbs not only replace the lost muscle glycogen, but also help the protein get into our muscle cells so it can synthesize into structural protein, or muscle itself.

Chicken or fish with a potato, egg whites with a piece of fruit, or a protein shake with fruit mixed in are good meals after resistance workouts but remember to keep the fiber low here. High fiber slows down digestion, meaning the protein will take longer to reach the muscle cells.

After resistance, it is recommended to wait 30 minutes before eating so as not to take blood away from your muscles too soon. The blood in your muscles helps with the repair process by removing metabolic waste products from them. Any fats should be consumed well before and well after exercise.

What To Eat Before and After a Workout

Here are some of the best foods to eat before and after a workout so can fuel up the right way.

Before: Smoothies

smothie

Need a snack on-the-go on your way to the gym? Stick with a smoothie. Not only are they time-friendly, building your own blend has a bunch of exercise benefits. For a foolproof formula, use your favorite sliced fruit, a cup of Greek yogurt and some granola for a thicker consistency. If you’re picking one up, check the label to make sure it’s made from whey or milk-based proteins. And no need to go overboard – 10 to 20 grams of protein before exercising is plenty.

Before: Whole Wheat Toast with Sliced Banana and Cinnamon

slice

When it comes to gearing up for workout, carbs are your gym BFF. The key is to have a mixed bag of complex and simple ones so that the release of energy during your workout is slow and steady throughout your routine. Whole-wheat toast with fruit gives you both types of carbs with the bonus of being super easy to digest. Complex carbs will keep your motor humming, while the fruit adds an extra kick of energy. For those training for a race, bananas are perfect in raising potassium levels, which drop when you sweat a lot. For an added bonus, add a dash of cinnamon. The spice has been linked to stabilizing blood sugar and improving brain function.

After: Grilled Chicken and Mixed Vegetables

slice 2

Your body is in recovery mode, so you need a nutrient dense dish. The lean protein and carbohydrates in chicken will fill you up without feeling overly bloated. Add some veggies in olive oil to keep your ticker in tip top shape.

Before: Greek Yogurt and Trail Mix

yammi

Getting ready for a long run? Eat some yogurt first. It’s easy on your stomach and when paired with trail mix can give you the little rev your body needs. Just make sure to choose a mix that is mostly nut and dried fruit based with as little fillers as possible. (Yes, sadly we’re talking about those little chocolates!) The healthy sugars from dried fruit provide that quick energy boost while seeds and nuts will keep insulin levels from dropping mid-workout. Just remember, a little bit goes a long way. Seeds and nuts are high in fat, which means they take longer to digest. Too many and you could start feeling sluggish and slow as you sweat.

After: Veggie Omelet with Avocado

yammi1

You already know eggs are a great source of protein and help aid in muscle recovery and growth. Switch it up from the usual scramble and make a veggie-packed omelet. Garnish with a few slices of avocado for fiber and monosaturated fats (the good kind!). Similar to olive oil, avocados can help your body better absorb fat soluble nutrients that your veggies have like vitamins A, D, E and K. These vitamins are stocked with antioxidants, the best boost for your body, inside and out.

After: Salmon with Sweet Potato

yammi2

side from the usual protein perks, salmon has bioactive peptides, small protein molecules that play a role in inflammation reduction, helping to regulate insulin levels and give you joint support. Sweet potatoes pack in those complex carbs as well as help to restore glycogen levels, which get depleted after a workout.

Before: Oatmeal with Fresh Fruit

yammi4

Oatmeal is the workout buddy you never have to nag to exercise. It sticks with you throughout your workout by gradually releasing sugar into your bloodstream. Adding fruit to your bowl will help increase the fluid content of your pre-workout snack, keeping you hydrated.

After: Whole Wheat Tuna Fish, Hummus and Spinach Sandwich

yammi5

If you’re a lunchtime exerciser, this is the sandwich for you. Tuna is low in calories, but high in protein and carbs. Hummus is a better-for-you spread over mayo or mustard, while also being high in fiber. And last but certainly not least, spinach is a produce powerhouse, handling everything from curbing your appetite to boosting your complexion and lowering blood pressure and inflammation.

Before: Apple Wedges with Almond Butter

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If it comes down to picking out of the candy dish or an apple for some pre-workout sugar, go for the apple. You’ll avoid a sugar crash mid-lunge while stocking up on vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. To keep your stomach from growling, spread a tablespoon of almond butter on your slices. It squashes hunger and amps energy levels up.

After: Chocolate Milk

milk choco

Recent research has shown that chocolate milk is the latest craze in post-workout snacks, even over water and sports drinks. That’s because it has everything you need in one glass: carbs and protein for muscle recovery, water content to replace the fluids lost as sweat and calcium, sodium and sugar – all ingredients that help you recover faster, retain water and regain energy. Got milk, anyone?

This article was originally published on GYM Flow100

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Rifat Jipu <![CDATA[Calorie Intake For Muscle Growth]]> http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/?p=4272 2015-07-30T20:41:40Z 2015-07-30T20:41:40Z Gaining muscle is hard work. You need extra calories to energize your heavy lifting workouts and to support muscle repair and growth that happens between these sessions. Understanding how to properly fuel will only enhance your efforts and help you reach your goals sooner. In order to […]

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Calorie Intake For Muscle Growth

Gaining muscle is hard work. You need extra calories to energize your heavy lifting workouts and to support muscle repair and growth that happens between these sessions. Understanding how to properly fuel will only enhance your efforts and help you reach your goals sooner.

In order to gain muscle, you must consume more calories than you burn. Your daily burn depends on many factors including your weight, age, gender and activity level. In this great video below by Sean Nalewanyj , he gives us 4 steps on gaining muscle by determining your preferred calorie intake.

Without a doubt, daily calorie intake is the most important dietary factor of all when it comes to your muscle building diet. If you don’t eat the proper number of calories to build muscle each day, your gains will either be far below your potential or complete non-existent.

The goal when calculating your individual daily calories to gain muscle is to create a small “calorie surplus” to provide your body with the extra energy needed to build muscle, but without going overboard so that fat gains can be kept to a minimum.

Here are the 4 steps I recommend following to calculate how many calories to gain weight per day you require…

Proper Calorie Intake To Build Muscle:

  1. Find your calorie maintenance level, which is the number of calories you need per day to maintain your current weight. To do this, just multiply your body weight in pounds by 14-16, selecting the higher or lower end depending on your daily activity level.
  2. Add 250-350 on top of your maintenance level. This will land you on the proper range of calories to build muscle per day. It’s large enough to build muscle effectively but small enough that fat gains will be kept under control.
  3. Monitor your changes in body weight and adjust your calorie intake up or down if necessary. The numbers you just calculated should be thought of as an “educated guess”, because you simply can’t know for sure *exactly* how many calories to gain muscle you require.
    So, if you’re a beginner and are gaining much less than 2 pounds per month, you’ll want to increase your calorie intake, and if you’re gaining much more than 3 pounds per month, dial them back slightly.

    For every year of proper training/eating you have under your belt, that 2-3 pound per month figure should decrease by about half.

  4. Whenever your weight gain stalls for a period of 2 weeks, increase your daily calorie intake by 100-150 to keep the process moving along.

So, if you’re trying to structure your bodybuilding diet properly then those are the 4 steps to follow to calculate your daily calories to gain muscle.

Don’t ignore this basic principle because it is by far the most crucial factor of your muscle building diet. You can put as much effort into the gym as you want, but if you aren’t eating the proper number of calories to gain weight consistently, you’ll be completely wasting your time altogether.

This article was originally published on GYMFlow100

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Rifat Jipu <![CDATA[Greg Plitt Motivational Video – Impact The World. Build Your Legacy. [Tribute]]]> http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/?p=4269 2015-07-28T19:50:04Z 2015-07-28T19:50:04Z “It’s called the pump people, you’ve got to experience it! It’s one of the better highs in life! You don’t need to shoot up for it, you don’t need to snort it, all you got to do is sweat for it!” – Greg Plitt “The only reps […]

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“It’s called the pump people, you’ve got to experience it! It’s one of the better highs in life! You don’t need to shoot up for it, you don’t need to snort it, all you got to do is sweat for it!” – Greg Plitt

h321

“The only reps you don’t grow from, are the reps you don’t fucking do.” – Greg Plitt

This article was originally published on simplyshredded.com

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Rifat Jipu <![CDATA[German Volume Training: A New Look At An Old Way To Build Mass & Strength]]> http://www.noexcusefitness.com.au/?p=4265 2015-07-26T23:06:14Z 2015-07-26T23:06:14Z Supersets and tri-sets allow you to perform a lot of work in a short period of time. The rest-pause method allows you to use heavier weights so you can recruit the higher-threshold muscle fibers, and eccentric training enables you to overcome strength plateaus. The bottom line is […]

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Supersets and tri-sets allow you to perform a lot of work in a short period of time. The rest-pause method allows you to use heavier weights so you can recruit the higher-threshold muscle fibers, and eccentric training enables you to overcome strength plateaus.

The bottom line is that almost any training method will work (provided you do it with intensity!), at least for the few weeks it takes for your body to adapt to it. There is, however, one training system that stands above all the rest. It’s brutally hard, but I’ve found it to be a very effective way to pack on muscle fast!

In strength-coaching circles, this method is often called the “10 sets method.” Because it has its roots in German-speaking countries, I like to call it German Volume Training. To the best of my knowledge, this training system originated in Germany in the mid-’70s and was popularized by Rolf Feser, who was then the National Coach of Weightlifting. A similar protocol was promoted by Vince Gironda in the US, but regardless of who actually invented it, it works.

In Germany, the 10 sets method was used in the off-season to help weightlifters gain lean body mass.

It was so efficient that lifters routinely moved up a full weight class within 12 weeks.

German Volume Training was the base program of Canadian weightlifter Jacques Demers, a silver medalist in the Los Angeles Olympic Games who was coached by Pierre Roy. Jacques was known in weightlifting circles for his massive thighs, and he gives credit to the German method for achieving such a spectacular level of hypertrophy. The same method was also used by Bev Francis in her early days of bodybuilding to pack on muscle.

How it works?

The German Volume Training program works because it targets a group of motor units, exposing them to an extensive volume of repeated efforts, specifically 10 sets of a single exercise. The body adapts to the extraordinary stress by hypertrophying the targeted fibers. To say this program adds muscle fast is probably an understatement. Gains of 10 pounds or more in six weeks are not uncommon, even in experienced lifters!

Goals and Guidelines

The goal of the German Volume Training method is to complete 10 sets of 10 reps with the same weight for each exercise. You want to begin with a weight you could lift for 20 reps to failure if you had to. For most people, on most exercises, that would represent 60 percent of their 1RM load. Therefore, if you can bench press 300 pounds for 1 rep, you would use 180 pounds for this exercise.

For lifters new to this method, I recommend using the following bodypart splits:

When using this German Volume Training program or any other, you should keep a detailed journal of the exact sets/reps and rest intervals performed, and only count the repetitions completed in strict form. Here are a few more guidelines to ensure optimal progress:

Rest Intervals:

When bodybuilders start with this method, they often question its value for the first several sets because the weight won’t feel heavy enough. However, there is minimal rest between sets (about 60 seconds when performed in sequence and 90-120 seconds when performed as a superset), which incurs cumulative fatigue. (Interestingly enough, you might find you get stronger again during the eighth and ninth sets. This is because of a short-term neural adaptation.)

Because of the importance of the rest intervals, you should use a stopwatch to keep the rest intervals constant. This is very important, as it becomes tempting to lengthen the rest time as you fatigue.

Tempo:

For long-range movements such as squats, dips and chins, use a 40X0 tempo; this means the eccentric portion of the exercise is 4 seconds and the concentric portion is done as rapidly as possible. For movements such as curls and triceps extensions, use a 3020 tempo.

Number of Exercises:

Perform one, and only one, exercise per bodypart. Therefore, select exercises that recruit a lot of muscle mass. Triceps kickbacks and leg extensions are definitely out; squats and bench presses are definitely in. For supplementary work for individual bodyparts (like triceps and biceps), you can do 3 sets of 10-20 reps.

Training Frequency:

Because German Volume Training is such an intense program, it’ll take you longer to recover. In fact, if you’re familiar with the writings of Peter Sisco and John Little, you’ll find that the average “Power Factor Rating” of the 10-sets method is about 8 billion.

Consequently, one training session every four to five days per bodypart is plenty.

Overload Mechanism:

Once you’re able to do 10 sets of 10 with constant rest intervals, increase the weight on the bar by 4 to 5 percent, and repeat the process. Refrain from using forced reps, negatives or burns. The volume of the work will take care of the hypertrophy. Expect to have some deep muscle soreness without having to resort to set-prolonging techniques. In fact, after doing a quad and hams session with this method, it takes the average bodybuilder about five days to stop limping.

Here are two examples of a German Volume Training workout, one for the beginner and one for the immediate-level trainee.

Beginner/Intermediate German Volume Training Program: Phase 1

This is a sample German Volume Training routine based on a five-day cycle. Once you’ve used this method for six workouts per bodypart, it’s time to move on to a more intensive program for a three-week period.

Day 1: Chest and Back

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset. Incidentally, I recommend only 3 sets of 10 in this program for the “B” exercises. The “B” exercises constitute supplementary work, and doing 10 sets of them would result in overtraining.

Day 2: Legs and Abs

Get a weightlifting belt and buckle it. Attach it to the low pulley of a cable crossover machine. Lie down on your back in front of the machine, and hook your feet in the belt. Then pull your knees towards your chest.

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset.

Day 3: Off

Day 4: Arms and Shoulders

While seated on the edge of a bench with your torso bent over, raise the dumbbells out to the side, making sure the top two knuckles (the ones closest to your thumb) are in line with your ears at the top of the movement.

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset. An “X” in the tempo means to move as fast as possible, keeping the weight under control.

Day 5: Off

Beginner/Intermediate German Volume Training Program: Phase 2

After six of those five-day cycles, I recommend you do a three-week phase in which the average set is 6-8 reps, and do only 4-6 sets per bodypart over a five-day cycle, or you can do any other split that suits your recovery pattern. After this three-week block, you can return to the German Volume Training method by doing the following routine of 10 sets of 6 reps. In the exercises that are prescribed for 10 sets, use a load with which you’d normally be able to do 12 repetitions. The goal in this phase is to do 10 sets of 6 with that load.
Sample 10 Sets of 6 Routine:

Day 1: Chest and Back

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset.

Day 2: Legs and Abs

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset.

Day 3: Off
Day 4: Arms and Shoulders

While seated on the edge of a bench with your torso bent over, raise the dumbbells out to the side, making sure the top two knuckles (the ones closest to your thumb) are in line with your ears at the top of the movement.

Notes: Rest 90 seconds between each “A” exercise and each superset; rest 60 seconds between each “B” exercise and each superset.

Day 5: Off

This German Volume Training program is elegant in its simplicity, but that’s what the Germans do best. Just ask any Porsche or BMW owner.

This article was originally published by Charles Poliquin on simplyshredded.com

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